Open access titles

Edited by Greg Woolf
January 12, 2018
Edited by Greg Woolf
January 12, 2018
Edited by Stuart Dunn and Simon Mahony
December 9, 2013

This edited volume collects together peer-reviewed papers that initially emanated from presentations at Digital Classicist seminars and conference panels.

This wide-ranging volume showcases exemplary applications of digital scholarship to the ancient world and critically examines the many challenges and opportunities afforded by such research. The chapters included here demonstrate innovative approaches that drive forward the research interests of both humanists and technologists while showing that rigorous scholarship is as central to digital research as it is to mainstream classical studies.

As with the earlier Digital Classicist publications, our aim is not to give a broad overview of the field of digital classics; rather...

Edited by Christopher Carey and Michael Edwards
December 2, 2013
Some two and a half millennia ago, in the summer of 490 BC, a small army of 9,000 Athenians, supported only be a thousand troops from Plataea, faced and overcame the might of the Persian army of King Darius I on the plain of Marathon.

While this was only the beginning of the Persian Wars, and the Greeks as a while would face a far greater threat to their freedom a decade later, the victory at Marathon had untold effects on the morale, confidence, and self-esteem of the Athenians, who would commemorate their finest hour in art and literature for centuries to come.

This volume, which includes twenty-one papers originally presented at a colloquium hosted by the Faculty of Philology at the University of Peloponnese, Kalamata in...
Lynn S. Fotheringham
December 2, 2013
This innovative approach to Cicero's persuasive language analyses the style and structure of one of his important speeches in more detail than has ever been done before.

It applies ideas from modern linguistics (sentential topic, lexical patterning, interactional discourse), and explores the possibilities and limitations of quantitative analysis, made easier by modern computing power, in the areas of syntax and vocabulary.

The result is a reading of the Pro Milone as a unified text, whether aimed at persuading the jury to acquit Milo or at persuading a wider audience that Milo should have been acquitted.

This reading not only contributes to our understanding of late republican discourse, but also...
Edited by Christos Kremmydas, Jonathan Powell, and Lene Rubinstein
November 4, 2013

This volume brings together six papers relating to oratory and orators in public fora of Classical Greece and Rome.

Edwards and Bers explore aspects of oratorical delivery in the Athenian courts and Assembly, including the demands placed on orators by the physical settings. Tempest examines the conceptions of oratorical competence and incompetence, particularly in respect of performance, as they are implied in Cicero’s criticisms of the rival prosecutor in the trial of Verres.

Papers by Karambelas and Powell look at evidence for the importance of advocacy in the Second Sophistic and the late Roman Empire respectively.

In an introduction, the editors discuss recurrent themes connected with the orator’s...

Edited by Ed Sanders
July 1, 2013

Arising out of a conference on ‘Erôs in Ancient Greece’, the articles in this volume share a historicizing approach to the conventions and expectations of erôs in the context of the polis, in the Archaic and Classical periods of ancient Greece.

The articles focus on (post-Homeric) Archaic and Classical poetic genres – namely lyric poetry, tragedy, and comedy – and some philosophical texts by Plato, Xenophon, and Aristotle.

They pursue a variety of issues, including: the connection between homosexual erôs and politics; sexual practices that fell outside societal norms (aristocratic homosexuality, chastity); the roles of sôphrosynê (self-control) and akrasia...