Publications search results

Elena Isayev
1 February 2007
A traveller today on a journey through the mountainous landscape of ancient Lucania would find it difficult to believe the high density of settlement which this corner of south-west Italy sustained in the fourth century BC. Networks incorporating much of the peninsula, Greece, Sicily, Epirus, Macedon and Carthage all found a foothold here. Ancient narratives, largely focusing on military contexts, give little sense of the nature of activity in the area, but the remains of material culture provide an image of thriving communities, not organised on the city-state model, which were active participants in the culture and power struggles of the Mediterranean in the period before Roman hegemony. This study brings together historical and...
Roy K. Gibson
1 February 2007
Ovid’s Ars Amatoria has long had a reputation for ‘excess’, both moral and stylistic. Augustus’ banishment of the poet to Romania in 8 AD – for teaching ‘foul adultery’ in the Ars – is partly responsible for this reputation, along with Roman love elegy’s well-known predilection for immoderate attitudes and alienation from the values of conventional society. The Ars is undoubtedly a work of subversive tendencies, but its larger reputation has made it difficult for readers to appreciate one of the most striking, yet characteristic, features of the poem. In the pursuit of erotic ends, Ovid recommends to his pupils stratagems of moderation and self-restraint. Ovid’s (hedonistic) middle way is both a novelty for elegy, which is more accustomed...
Edited by George Karamanolis and Anne Sheppard
5 October 2006
As the study of later ancient philosophy has developed in recent years, it has offered new insights into both the continuing vigour of the Greco-Roman philosophical tradition and the interaction of that tradition with the new cultures of Christianity and of the Arab community. This volume addresses a key figure in this interaction. Porphyry (234?c.305 AD) was not only the greatest pupil of Plotinus and editor of his work but also a significant philosopher in his own right. Many aspects of Porphyry’s work have been re-appraised in recent years in the light of renewed interest in Neoplatonism as in later ancient philosophy in general. New editions and translations of Porphyry’s works have appeared enabling up-to-date discussion of...
Edited by Paul Holder
9 June 2006
Roman Military Diplomas V presents 154 diplomas, and incorporates them into the updated chronologies witness lists and indexes which are a key part of the Roman Military Diplomas series.

A few of the diplomas were prepared by the late Margaret Roxan and some others were found after her death in preparation. Otherwise, the intention has been to bring together diplomas published by the end of 2003. But the large number included in this volume also reflects the active interest of collectors and the results of metal detecting. 

The lively market in diplomas has, however, also had less benign consequences and the volume has an important appendix on the production of fakes.

The volume...
Edited by John Davison et. al
31 March 2006
This volume vividly demonstrates the richness and wide scope of contemporary engagement with Greek drama in scholarship and performance.

Key studies of the interaction between performance, politics and society range from the detection of Sophocles' infiltration of the culture through different kinds of evidence B not a linear narrative but a 'mosaic' B to modern performance in South Africa. Gender issues explored include Euripides' interest in female experience, especially the subjection of young women to male violence, and a study of representations in tragedy of homosexuality and pederasty.The role of drama, both tragedy and comedy, in the creation of Athenian identity includes a review of the way that dramatists used the Trojan...
William Stenhouse
4 July 2005
Reading inscriptions and writing Ancient History shows how the work of a group of scholars active in Rome in the middle of the sixteenth century redefined the scope and nature of historical writing.

Fascinated by the remains of the Classical world and particularly by inscriptions in stone, they began to collect and compare inscriptions, creating systems of classification and ways of representing their finds that shaped all subsequent attempts to do the same. They then began to question the value of inscriptions as historical sources and realised that by looking at them as objects B rather than simply as texts written on a particular durable medium B, they could extract more information, particularly when they examined...
Mohammad Nafissi
21 June 2005
For over a century the foundations of Athenian political economy have been debated by scholarly camps broadly described as primitivist/substantivist, modernist and Marxist and involving political economists, sociologists and anthropologists as well as historians and classicists.

Ancient Athens and modern ideology demonstrates the dialectic of intellectual and substantive history and offers a consensual resolution to the debate by examining the interplay of values, theories and evidence in the contributions of Max Weber (1864-1920), Karl Polanyi (1886-1964) and Moses Finley (1912-86), widely recognised as successive champions of the primitivist cause. Pursuing Finley’s own ‘official’ account of his intellectual roots...
James E. G. Zetzel
2 June 2005
The Satires of Persius combine powerful criticism of the moral corruption of Rome under Nero with a rich and innovative style that required commentary almost from his own time. The enduring appeal and originality of his poetry also ensured that the exegetical tradition has been continuous from the first century to the present.

Marginal scholarship and textual deviance examines the origins and history of a major component of the medieval commentary on Persius but also has a larger goal. The volume uses detailed study of Carolingian exegesis of Persius to consider wider questions about the transmission and form of the remains of ancient scholarship on Latin poetry. Through these explorations James Zetzel also considers the nature of...
O Krzyszkowska
1 March 2005
Seals and sealings provide an extremely rich source of evidence for the Aegean Bronze Age. They are truly monuments in miniature, offering insights into art and iconography, craft and technology, social status, administration and more besides.

Aegean Seals is the first comprehensive overview of this fascinating subject, tracing the development of seals and sealing practices from the third millennium to the end of the Bronze Age, with particular emphasis on the great palace civilizations of Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece.

Copiously illustrated, this study combines original research with critical analysis of specialist literature and presents many recent discoveries.
Edited by Peter Adamson et. al
1 January 2005

This two volume Supplement to the Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies represents the proceedings of a conference held at the Institute on 27-29 June, 2002 in honour of Richard Sorabji.


These volumes, which are intended to build on the massive achievement of Professor Sorabji’s Ancient Commentators on Aristotle series, focus on the commentary as a vehicle of philosophical and scientific thought.

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