Publications search results

Edited by Chiara Thumiger
19 November 2007
Hidden paths analyses the representation of character in Greek tragedy, focusing on one of the most important and controversial theatre plays of all times the Bacchae. Euripides’ last play has always been a favourite, enjoying an enormous success for centuries on and off the stage. This book argues that in the representation of characters in the play we can find a development in the view of self and representation of man. This development, which is also to be partly traced in the works of Sophocles and in earlier plays by Euripides, finds a fuller expression in the Bacchae and culminates in the catastrophe of ignorance and incommunicability which has Pentheus at its centre. The construction of character in the text and the...
Jonathan Powell
1 November 2007
In the ancient world Classical rhetoric and its practices raised major ethical doubts and questions which have continued to affect – even to prejudice – our judgment of orators and oratory today. One of the key components of practical oratory was rational argument. The six chapters in this volume examine different aspects of the role of rational argument in Classical oratory and rhetoric and its later tradition. Michael Gagarin discusses the role of argumentation in the works of Antiphon, the earliest Greek orator whose continuous texts survive. Christos Kremmydas analyses the argumentative strategies in a political speech of Demosthenes, the attack on the law of Leptines (Demosthenes 20). Two chapters then focus on Cicero: Jakob Wisse...
Lexicography, Scholarship, and Society
Fay Glinister and Clare Woods and edited by J.A. North and M.H. Crawford
1 October 2007
Burned, water-damaged, lost for centuries – the text we know today as ‘Festus’ barely survived to the modern era, but since its re-discovery in the fifteenth century it has exercised some of the greatest minds in the history of scholarship. Today the sole surviving manuscript lies in the airy calm of the Biblioteca Nazionale at Naples, a precious link to the great outpouring of scholarship during the last centuries of the Roman Republic.

Festus’ Lexicon took shape over several centuries through the efforts of three men in particular: Verrius Flaccus, the antiquarian who rose from humble origins to enjoy a successful career in the service of the emperor Augustus; Festus, an obscure intellectual who abridged Verrius’ monumental work...
A.D. Morrison
1 October 2007
Pindar’s fifteen victory odes for Sicilian victors include some of Pindar’s most impressive and widely admired poems, such as the first two Olympians and first three Pythians. The majority of the Sicilian odes date from between about 476 to 466 BC and were composed to celebrate the victories of the great tyrants of Sicily Hieron of Syracuse and Theron of Akragas or their families or courtiers at the crown games. The Sicilian tyrants made spectacular use of their wealth and power in competing in equestrian events at the games and in commissioning Pindar and Bacchylides to celebrate their victories in song. This book examines the Sicilian odes of Pindar as a group, investigating the ways in which they interact and exploit their overlapping...
Edited by J.R.W Prag
3 September 2007
Corruption in office, pervasive, subversive and perennial, requires the state to examine itself, its ethical values and its ways of working. The prosecution for corruption of Gaius Verres, governor of Sicily, has long been recognized for its exposure of ruthless depredation, of personal debauchery and abuse of office, and for the skilled presentation of the case by Cicero in his speech to the court as prosecutor. Longest of Cicero’s surviving orations and his only prosecution speech, the Verrines are an immensely rich source of evidence for Roman provincial government, for Roman law and above all for the rhetoric of prosecution. Deriving from a colloquium held at the Institute of Classical Studies in 2004, these papers confront directly...
Edited by Richard Sorabji
13 August 2007
Between 100 BC and 200 AD Rome took up the ongoing philosophy of the Greeks. The extraordinary wealth of ideas is reflected in the four main schools, Platonists, Aristotelians, Stoics and Epicureans, while there are also Pythagoreans who blend with the Platonists there are Pyrrhonian sceptics and there are Cynics who cannot easily be called a school. Then there are the individuals who call for separate treatment. These include Cicero Philo of Alexandria – a commentator on the books of Moses in the Old Testament – and two of the West’s greatest-ever scientists, Ptolemy in astronomy and Galen in medicine.There were major new developments in all the schools but despite its importance the large number of schools and individuals has itself...
Ulrike Roth
1 July 2007
Thinking Tools sets out to question the prevalent assumption that the slave economy of late Republican and early Imperial Italy was based on a largely adult male slave population. The author draws both on a close reading of the Roman agricultural writers and on visual and archaeological evidence to argue that the Roman villas of the Italian countryside were normally staffed by slave families.In doing so, she both demonstrates the role of female labour in the productive landscape of Roman Italy and radically revises our estimate of the economic potential of the slave estates in Italy created by the development of the Roman empire overseas. Thinking Tools provides fresh insights into everyday nutrition and...
Edited by John Drinkwater and Benet Salway
1 July 2007
Wolf Liebeschuetz is one of the most distinguished, creative and best-liked of contemporary Ancient Historians. In his fifty-year career of teaching and publication Wolf, German-born and British-educated, has informed generations of scholars – collaborating, instructing, disputing and commenting on research.In this volume, coinciding with his eightieth birthday, twenty historians and archaeologists who have known Wolf as friends, colleagues and pupils acknowledge and celebrate his influence by presenting papers on topics related to his four monographs: Antioch: City and Imperial Administration in the Later Roman Empire (1972); Continuity and Change in Roman Religion (1980); Barbarians and Bishops...
Edited by Christopher Stray
4 June 2007
Classical Books explores the interface between the history of books and the history of classical scholarship. Its contributors investigate the background to the production of texts, editions, histories and dictionaries many of which are now taken for granted by scholars. Abandoned authors blind alleys, false starts and fierce competition: Classical Books takes us behind the placid facades on library shelves to the processes of commissioning, writing, editing, design and printing which led to the publication of the books we use. Some of the books discussed were the work of major figures in nineteenth- and twentieth-century scholarship B Jowett, Murray, Jebb, Wilamowitz B but many lesser-known scholars also...
Elena Isayev
1 February 2007
A traveller today on a journey through the mountainous landscape of ancient Lucania would find it difficult to believe the high density of settlement which this corner of south-west Italy sustained in the fourth century BC. Networks incorporating much of the peninsula, Greece, Sicily, Epirus, Macedon and Carthage all found a foothold here. Ancient narratives, largely focusing on military contexts, give little sense of the nature of activity in the area, but the remains of material culture provide an image of thriving communities, not organised on the city-state model, which were active participants in the culture and power struggles of the Mediterranean in the period before Roman hegemony. This study brings together historical and...

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