Sheila Kassman Memorial Lecture: 'Aristotle on the anatomy, physiology and psychology of animal locomotion'

Sheila Kassman Memorial Lecture: 'Aristotle on the anatomy, physiology and psychology of animal locomotion'
Date
10 March 2020, 5.00pm - 7.00pm
Type
Lecture
Venue
Bloomsbury Room, G35, Ground Floor, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
Description

Christof Rapp, LMU Munich


Studying the joints of animals in his biological writings Aristotle came to conclude that the flexion and straightening of the limbs would not be possible without some resting point within the joint. He further concluded that the same principle must hold not only of the movement of particular limbs, but also of the movement of the animal as a whole, so that, when the animal moves as a whole, there must be a region within the animal that remains at rest. Aristotle’s anatomic scrutiny of different types of joints thus confirms a very general principle of his physics and cosmology, namely that all movement presupposes something unmoved. In his De Motu Animalium Aristotle draws on this principle to account for the physiology and psychology of animal locomotion.

Contact

Valerie James
valerie.james@sas.ac.uk
020 7862 8716